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Violin Girolamo Amati

chordophone

 

This violin bears the label of Girolamo Amati (c.1561-1630) and could date from 1611. Girolamo Amati was the son of Andrea Amati (c. 1505-1577), considered to be the founder of the Cremona School of Violin Making. With his half-brother Antonio (c. 1540-1607), Girolamo perfected the art of violin making and established the reputation of his hometown in this field.

The instrument was acquired by the MIM in 1965 from the E.M.W. Paul collection, a pseudonym of Paul Rosenbaum (19??-1966), a London-based string instrument collector. Its attribution is however impossible to prove. But the instrument is certainly very old. In 2007, it was subjected to a dendrochronological analysis, a scientific technique that allows the spruce to be dated by studying growth rings. This research showed that the soundboard of the violin consists of two boards from the same tree. The oldest record dates back to 1484 and the most recent to 1548. The construction of the table took place obviously after this last date. Considering that the year of the last ring observed is sometimes much earlier than the year of felling the tree, and that luthiers let their wood dry for a long time before using it, the violin itself could date from the early 17th century. 

 

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Violin, Girolamo Amati, inv. 4160 ©mim
Violin, Girolamo Amati, inv. 4160 ©mim
Violin, Girolamo Amati, inv. 4160 ©mim
Violin, Girolamo Amati, inv. 4160 ©mim
Violin, Girolamo Amati, inv. 4160 ©mim
Violin, Girolamo Amati, inv. 4160, label ©mim